Tag Archive: Venture Capitalist

  1. 800px-Alternative_Energies
    by Angie Chang

    Women And Clean Energy: Overcoming The Double Standard

    Women in clean energy may now occupy a small place, but it’s never a dull place!

    By Nancy Pfund (Managing Director, DBL Investors)

    As a woman in venture capital, I am part of a small club, and it’s part of my job to try to change that. As a woman in clean tech venture capital, the club is smaller still – but somehow it fits like a glove.

    While it pains me to say this, women in clean tech venture capital are as much the exception to the rule as renewable energy is to the U.S. energy supply.

    For example, for all the hoopla

  2. intel-capital
    by Angie Chang

    Looking For A ‘Partner in Crime’ At Intel Capital

    You complement our diverse crew (a FEM of 67!) with collective experiences ranging from serial entrepreneur seed investor investment banker.

    By Christine Herron (Director, Intel Capital)

    We recently announced that Intel Capital Director Baris Aksoy is headed to Turkey to lead our new Istanbul office. As suspected, this means that we are seeking a new Director to join us on the Consumer Internet team at Intel Capital. Interested? Read on.

    Who are we looking for? Ideally, our new partner is based in the Bay Area, has a great network, and is known and respected as an Internet investor. You complement our diverse crew (a FEM of 67!) with collective experiences ranging from serial entrepreneur seed investor investment banker.

  3. raising-money
    by Angie Chang

    Why You Should Talk To Investors (Even If You’re Not Looking To Raise Any Money)

    I’ve been on the fence about raising money for my second startup.

    By Erica Douglass (Co-Founder & CEO, Whoosh Traffic)

    As the owner of a startup, should you raise money for your business?

    There are arguments both ways. In the software industry, developers are expensive, and it may take 12-24 months to come up with a viable product. Also, software companies are typically popular with acquirers, as the perception is that there is less work involved and they are more “scalable” than a service-oriented business. (Instagram had just 13 employees and was acquired for $1 billion.)

    The flip side is that you can give up a lot of your company (and, perhaps more importantly, control of your company) to investors, and it may take you some months or years to find the right