Tag Archive: Confidence

  1. 4195916777_986fd1a5c6_z
    by Angie Chang

    Girls, Repeat After Me: "I’m Great"

    Editor’s note: Joy will be a judge at the Women 2.0 Conference on February 14, evaluating the 10 women-led startups pitching live onstage for PITCH SF Startup Competition!

    By Joy Marcus (Partner, DFJ Gotham Ventures)

    Recently, my 12 year old daughter suffered her first real crisis of confidence. She did badly on a math test (usually an easy A for her). She found out just as she was going to take another test which affected her score on the subsequent test. Not a great sequence of events.

  2. 4559445857_d8288cd3ac_z
    by Angie Chang

    Do You Sabotage Your Own Success?

    You are scared because you want it. You are scared because you know you have the chance to be amazing. You are scared because it means something to you. This is your brain weighing risk and reward. Take the reward.

    By Kelly Studer (Career Stylist, Kelly Studer Consulting)

    Not that long ago, I was lined up to speak on a panel to 100+ people when the organizer called and asked me if I’d be willing to give the keynote speech. They came to me with this request only 8 days before the event, so I assumed they were only asking me

  3. GorillaBeatingChest
    by Angie Chang

    Get The Tech Job Without The "Chest-Thumping"

    The founders of coding school Hackbright Academy explain why they went with an all-female format and how it’s working out for graduates.

    By Jessica Stillman (Contributing Writer, Women 2.0)

    Startup fever may be raging like never before, but the number of women graduating from computer science programs is actually falling. Christian Fernandez, co-founder of Hackbright Academy, has his suspicions as to what’s to blame from this paradox.

    “It’s purely anecdotal but there are a lot of women who

  4. women_techmakers-95
    by Angie Chang

    Watch The Women Techmakers Panel At Google I/O 2012 (Video)

    “Get out of the mode of what you do day-to-day and what is important today, and get a new perspective.”

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    In the days leading up to the Google developer confeerence – Google I/O 2012 – a Women Techmakers event at Google’s San Francisco office was the hottest ticket in town.

    Women building products at Google sat on the panel moderated by Megan Smith (VP, Google), who kicked off the panel by citing Alice Walker – “we are the ones we’ve been waiting for”. She encouraged the audience to take ownership of projects to reap benefits for both your company and your career. She moderates a thoughtful discussion on women in technology today.

  5. slide-1-728
    by Angie Chang

    To Get More Confidence: Do Confidence-Building Things

    By Debra Benton (President, Benton Management Resources)

    If there are ten traits to being a leader, the first seven – no, the first eight – would be confidence.

    With confidence, you hire and develop the right people because you aren’t jealous of the abilities of others. Differing opinions get voiced because folks aren’t apprehensive of your insecurities.

    You’ll make decisions sooner because advancement, not fear of failure, is the driving force behind your actions. Communication improves because

  6. 3508186511_cc439a326d_z
    by Angie Chang

    4 Tips On Building Your Business By Increasing Your Confidence

    By Geri Stengel (Founder, Ventureneer)

    Dareth Colburn always thought men were smarter than she was. It was what she’d been taught as a child. Her brothers were told to be their own boss; she was told that if she went to the right school, she could be an executive secretary and to forget about design school in New York; it was too far away for a girl from Harvard, MA.

    Eight years ago, as a single mother with $30,000 in debt, Colburn started USABride, an online store that sells bridal accessories – jewelry, veils and tiaras. “I was always a girly girl,” she says, so when faced with destitution and a desire to avoid a return

  7. 6476952999_ab885a0c03_z
    by Angie Chang

    Why Don’t More Women Go Big With Their Business?

    By Jazmin Hupp (Director of Awesome, Tekserve)

    With few female entrepreneurs to look to, MIT Sloan hosted a panel on how women can go big with their own businesses. The panel included Joanna Rees (Founder of VSP Capital), Katrina Markoff (Founder of Vosges Haut-Chocolat), Alexandra Wilkis Wilson (Founder of Gilt Groupe), and was moderated by Fredricka Whitfield (Anchor, CNN).

    What Is Getting In the Way?

    Joanna thinks that fear and giving up after set-backs get in women’s way. Some women quit after their first major

  8. 180886-virginia-ginni-rometty
    by Angie Chang

    Why Women Leaders Need Self-Confidence

    By Leslie Pratch (Contributor, Harvard Business Review)

    On January 1, Virginia Rometty will become the first female CEO of International Business Machines Corp. Articles about her have lauded her ability to blend enthusiasm, charisma, clear communication, strategic thinking, and “cool-minded” decision making. But one New York Times story placed the emphasis on the role self-confidence may have played into her success:

    Early in her career, Virginia M. Rometty, I.B.M.’s next chief executive, was offered a big job, but she felt she did not have enough experience. So she told the recruiter she needed time to think about it.

  9. sandy-jen-360
    by Angie Chang

    Mentorship and Networking Especially Important for Women Entrepreneurs (Stories of Leadership)

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Last week, Andreessen Horowitz invited women to their Menlo Park office to hear stories from leaders: Padmasree Warrior (CTO, Cisco), Marissa Mayer (VP Location & Local, Google), Freada Kapor Klein (Founder, Level Playing Field Institute), Angela Benton (Founder, NewME), and Sandy Jen (Co-Founder & CTO, Meebo).

    Panel moderator and TechCrunch writer Vivek Wadhwa conducted research with NCWIT, finding that the only difference between women and men to become entrepreneurs is that women feel discouraged from starting up.

  10. career_advices_for_women
    by Angie Chang

    How to Self-Promote Without Backlash (Women’s Career Advice)

    By Joan C. Williams & Rachel Dempsey (Authors, The New Girls’ Network) As we discussed in our last post, a recent study by the non-profit Catalyst found that the best strategy to get a raise is to make your achievements known around the office. Seems simple enough, right? Let your co-workers know about a deal that went your way. Be sure to get credit for ideas you originate. Mention that big account you just landed at the next partner’s meeting. Except, as it turns out, self-promotion is just as likely to make people think you’re a jerk as it is to make people think you deserve a raise or a promotion.

  11. suw
    by Angie Chang

    Two Tough Questions From Women in Tech at Startup Weekend

    By Janine Popick (Co-Founder & CEO, VerticalResponse)

    At a recent Startup Weekend, an impromptu gathering with young women in tech brought up some interesting questions.

    My e-mail marketing company, VerticalResponse, recently partnered with Startup Weekend, an amazing event where entrepreneurs get a little over two days to come up with an idea, pitch it to a crowd and work on one of about 20 ideas selected by their peers.

    Participants choose whether or not they want to participate on any of the 20 teams, and they start to

  12. 3867767246_a59b722717_z
    by Managing Editor

    Four Ways Women Stunt Their Careers Unintentionally (HBR)

    By Jill Flynn, Kathryn Heath, & Mary Davis Holt (Principals, Flynn Heath Holt Leadership)

    Having combed through more than a thousand 360-degree performance assessments conducted in recent years, we’ve found, by a wide margin, that the primary criticism men have about their female colleagues is that the women they work with seem to exhibit low self-confidence.

  13. 541301944_23205e16b0_z
    by Angie Chang

    Women, Arrogance and The Next Steve Jobs

    By Swathy Prithivi (Head of Corporate Development, Sonim Technologies)

    In “Who Will Be the Next Steve Jobs?” in the Wall Street Journal, Vinod Khosla, entrepreneur and venture capitalist extraordinaire, lists two key characteristics of “would-be revolutionaries” — unbridled confidence and arrogance.

    A recent tweet by Silicon Valley scholar Vivek Wadhwa says: “More than 50% of Silicon Valley is foreign born. Less than 5% women… A lot needs to be fixed.”

    To me, these things are the two sides of the same coin.