Tag Archive: Angel investing

  1. 3211195068_b712406ba7_z
    by Angie Chang

    Why Entrepreneurs Need Angels – And How Angels Are Improving

    Many people assume that venture capitalists provide startup funding. But that hasn’t been the case in the last decade – VCs usually step in with growth funding, after a new firm has proven itself to some degree…

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Here is an interview with Marianne Hudson, executive director of the Angel Resource Institute about the importance of angel investors to early-stage entrepreneurs:

    Angel investors, or simply “angels,” are high-net-worth individuals who provide money for startup firms with growth potential. Often former entrepreneurs themselves, angels can bring value to new firms through mentoring and industry connections as well.

    Angel investing was long done in an informal, isolated fashion but is now becoming more systematic and organized

  2. 4142836106_6da1cc87ce_z
    by Angie Chang

    A Growing Angel Investment Trend – "The Mommy Investor"

    Rather than turning to traditional at-home employment or entrepreneurship, moms now have an opportunity to begin leveraging their own money and their marketplace knowledge to make money with their minds, instead of their sweat.

    By Lacey Moler (Co-Founder, Belly Ballot)

    Many moms have probably considered starting their own business or finding a job that will allow them to work from home. As children age, moms often find more free time on their hands, or perhaps there are financial pressures, which have made extra income a necessity. In last 10 years, moms have been incredibly successful at closing the mom/professional gap. In fact, stay-at-home moms have created some of the most successful digital blogs, publications, and startups.

    But where do we go from here? What other opportunities are available for the aspiring professional mom with diapers in one hand, and a business plan in the other?

  3. music-for-the-masses-ladida-prerna-gupta
    by Angie Chang

    This Is What An Angel Investor Looks Like – Prerna Gupta

    Women 2.0 profiles women angel investors in our “This Is What An Angel Investor Looks Like” series.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Out of Atlanta, Georgia – Khush founder and CEO Prerna Gupta received funding from 500 Startups as part of the Mountain View, California-based startup seed fund and accelerator program in early 2011. By year’s end, the intelligent music app startup Khush was acquired by Smule for an undisclosed amount.

    As CEO of Khush, Prerna oversaw the growth of Khush and its merger with Smule. Together, the companies’ apps have reached over 50 million users worldwide.

    She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University in 2004 with a degree in Economics, and

  4. 6a00d83451b2c969e2017743a10470970d-500wi
    by Angie Chang

    The Power Of Diversification (Investing In Startups)

    You need to make enough investments to be confident that you will get at least one big winner. And so that means making enough bets.

    By Fred Wilson (Managing Partner, Flatiron Partners & Union Square Ventures)

    Investing in startups is risky. If you make just one investment, you are likely going to lose everything. If you make two, you are still likely to lose money. If you make five, you might get all your money back across all five investments. If you make ten, you might start making money on the aggregate set of investments.

    The math behind this is pretty simple. If you assume that the average startup has a 33% chance of making money for the investors, a 33% chance of returning capital, and a 33% chance of losing everything and that only 10% will make a big return

  5. PipelineF
    by Angie Chang

    Angel Investing Training, Pipeline Fellowship, Launches Executive Program for Applicants Outside of Boston and New York City

    By A. Lauren Abele (COO, Pipeline Fellowship)

    The Pipeline Fellowship trains women philanthropists to become angel investors through education, mentoring, and practice.

    Currently, the Pipeline Fellowship offers its traditional programs in Boston (Dec. 2011 to May 2012) and New York City (Jan. 2012 to Jun. 2012).

    For applicants based outside of Boston and New York City, the Pipeline Fellowship has created an executive program that will be held in New York City (Jan. 2012 to Jun. 2012).

  6. Liberty Close-Up
    by Angie Chang

    Pipeline Fellowship Announces Call for Applications: NYC, Boston

    By A. Lauren Abele (COO, Pipeline Fellowship)

    The Pipeline Fellowship announces a call for applications in New York, NY and — for the first time -— Boston, MA.

    The Pipeline Fellowship seeks to increase the number of women angel investors (only 13% of U.S. angels are women1) through its six-month angel investing bootcamp, which is specifically designed for women who are first-time angel investors. While Fellows come from a variety of backgrounds (law, finance, healthcare, the arts, small business, and more), they all share a common interest in learning to invest for good.