Tag Archive: video

  1. skybox-imaging-logo-lg
    by Angie Chang

    The Well-Funded Aerospace Startup You Never Heard of

    Ching-Yu Hu, co-founder of Skybox Imaging, talks about building and scaling a company with a bold vision. Her talk begins at minute 30 of the hour-long video.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Four years after Skybox Imaging started at Stanford University, Skybox’s founders (Dan Berkenstock, Julian Mann, John Fenwick and Ching-Yu Hu) kicked off Stanford’s E-Week at STVP’s Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders seminar.

    Hear the team of Stanford alumni explain their passion

  2. 84754189_640
    by Angie Chang

    An Enterprising Approach to Investment: Cindy Padnos

    “Most venture capital investors assess a founder… ‘are they able to attract the best people, surround themselves with the most talented individuals, are they willing to be challenged by other people…”

    By Sarah Cone (Venture Associate, Illuminate Ventures)

    Cindy Padnos is the Founder and Managing Partner of Illuminate Ventures, a Micro VC fund focused on early-stage cloud enterprise. As an investor, Cindy brings wealth of operating experience to the table being a 3x successful serial entrepreneur with one IPO and two M&A exits.

  3. 4434549688_c8638b952d_z
    by Angie Chang

    A City Of Doers: San Francisco – Where The World Changes (Video)

    We are a city of doers and dreamers, where change is the only constant – where we rewrite the rules of business.

    By Heather Hiles (Founder & CEO, Pathbrite)

    The City of San Francisco has joined with several partners to develop a short film designed to drive business attraction and growth in San Francisco, increase tourism, and showcase San Francisco as the innovation capital of the world. The film, and short vignettes, entitled “San Francisco: Where the World Changes”, features San Francisco-based business leaders and innovators

  4. dsc5616
    by Angie Chang

    TechStars: Movin’ On Up!

    The last three months has condensed a very sharp learning curve into an incredibly short amount of time.

    By Paige Brown (Co-Founder & CEO, Dashbell)

    Where do I even begin? The last three months has been the most challenging, rewarding and of my life. It’s been almost four years since I decided to step off the ledge of entrepreneurship and I most certainly have not looked back since. One thing I love about startups is the constant challenge, the severe learning curve and the need to continue to push oneself further.

  5. tokii-business-idea
    by Angie Chang

    The Social Media Model And What It Means For Tokii (Presence And Patience)

    It might not be your social media presence that will sink or float your boat, but rather your absence.

    By Karla Stephens-Tolstoy (Founder & CEO, Tokii)

    Tokii has been in business for more than 18 months now, and we’ve been running a social media campaign since its inception. It didn’t take a rocket scientist on staff to determine we needed to rev up our engines by launching a social media campaign, and we’ve done just that. We’ve focused on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

  6. 2722069686_7b5d249794_o
    by Angie Chang

    On Average, New Firms Create Three MILLION New Jobs A Year (Kauffman Video)

    Entrepreneurs drive job creation in the United States.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    In today’s economy, we worry about jobs. But here at Women 2.0, we celebrate women entrepreneurs for their role in job creation.

    Entrepreneurs, not large companies, create three million new jobs annually, as the Kauffman Foundation reminds us in the Sketchbook video

  7. 5967904595_818268c06e_z
    by Angie Chang

    From Actor To CEO – To Pitch Contest!

    To prepare, we watched all the pitches from the last Women 2.0 PITCH Startup Competition and noted not only the questions the judges asked, but also which pitches we liked the best and why.

    By Kathryn Velvel Jones (Founder & CEO, VirtualArtsTV)

    After 16 years as a professional actor/producer, I took a job as Vice President of business development for an online video startup in 2008. I knew an office job was going to be a difficult adjustment, but I also knew that this was a job I had to take.

    For those of us who remain actors out of a great love of the work, the lifestyle is mostly grim. I spent my 20s pounding the proverbial pavement (sadly, not a metaphor) until finally I decided that waiting for other people to make my dreams come true wasn’t going to cut it anymore. It was time to create my own opportunities.

  8. kauffman
    by Angie Chang

    The Sad Reality Of Women-Owned Businesses (Video)

    We have a lot of untapped human capital and potential in women in this country and we need to do more to encourage that.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Senior Research Fellow Alicia Robb spells out the unfortunate reality of women-led businesses today in the latest animated Sketchbook video produced by the Kauffman Foundation.

    She points out that a “sad truth is that women are not making as much progress as a lot of statistics that you see out there would lead you to believe,” explaining:

    “You hear a lot about the number of women-owned businesses growing faster than firms overall.

    But that’s just a reflection of a lower base and

  9. google-io-logo
    by Angie Chang

    Google I/O Session "Designing for the Other Half: Sexy Isn’t Always Pink" (Video)

    Watch a panel of women in technology and entrepreneurship talk about building products for inclusion.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    After the powerhouse Women Techmakers panel of Googlers kicked off Google I/O festivities in San Francisco, a panel of women in technology and entrepreneurship were featured at Google I/O talking about “Designing for the Other Half: Sexy Isn’t Always Pink”.

    Panelists for the session included TaskRabbit founder and CEO Leah Busque, Women 2.0 Director of All Things Offline Sepideh Nasiri, Polyvore co-founder and CEO Jess Lee, Pinterest engineer Tracy Chou, and Playmatics CEO Margaret Wallace.

  10. 7443721616_64b3bf3789_z
    by Angie Chang

    When Women Lead, The World Improves (XX Diplomacy)

    In developing and developed nations, women in key decision-making roles increase economic growth, GDP.

    By Cari Guittard (Founding Principal, Global Engagement Partners)

    For all that women have accomplished over the years and for all the shattered glass ceilings, in global careers and foreign policy positions there are still too few women. These statistics are all the more shocking given the reams of research on the positive, dramatic impact women have if they are in leadership positions.

    Dr. Amanda Nimon-Peters, an Australian-born behavioral scientist whom I have worked with at the Hult International Business School in Dubai, outlines the impact women in leadership have on decision-making in a powerful speech she gives entitled “When Women Lead, the World Improves”

  11. Picture-1
    by Angie Chang

    Lover.ly Founder & CEO Kellee Khalil On Partnerships, Revenue (Video)

    Founder Kellee Khalil has big plans for the company, hoping to eventually follow a woman through all the big life stages, like wedding, pregnancy, moving into a new homes, and being a newlywed.

    By Jordan Crook (Writer, TechCrunch)

    In a world where Pinterest is filled with wedding gear and the economic downturn has scratched “wedding planner” off of the affordable options list, it was only a matter of time before a wedding planning service sprouted up on the web. That service is called Lover.ly.

    Lover.ly has recently partnered with various brands like Nordstrom, Kwiat, and Minted to let users buy exactly what they see online. This makes the site a place where tasks actually get executed, rather than simply planned out (or worse yet, dreamed about). Not to mention, Lover.ly is generating revenue by capitalizing

  12. 2648105414_4c53e30f1c_z
    by Angie Chang

    Women 2.0 Saves Orange County, Networks Women Entrepreneurs

    The next Founder Friday Orange County is June 1 hosted by Moon Cho, founder of Ying and Yang Living – Free RSVP for Founder Friday Orange County here.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    At the Orange County edition of Founder Friday last month, SKINMETRO co-founder and president Yaneth Acosta stated, “I’m so proud to be here today, it’s a proud day for Orange County – we have something better than Orange County Housewives right now we can brag about so thank you Women 2.0 you saved Orange County!”

    At the beginning of the Founder Friday Orange County launch event, Women 2.0 director Sepideh Nasiri instructed the crowd, “What we would like for you to do today is meet at least one inspiring person, hopefully inspire someone else and then pass it on

  13. AsBNNcsCAAEZvVK
    by Angie Chang

    Founder Friday Launches In Orange County, San Diego

    Women 2.0 director Sepideh Nasiri attended Founder Friday Orange County and San Diego last week.

    By Sepideh Nasiri (Director of All Things Offline, Women 2.0)

    Last Thursday night’s Founder Friday Orange County was a success. You would not think of Orange County as a hotbed of startups. There were many interesting and successful female entrepreneurs in the room and filled it with great energy. In addition, many organizations were excited and reached out to help make Founder Friday bigger and better.

    There were two startup founders who spoke at the Founder Friday Orange County. Fight Class founder and host Kristen Nedopak (pictured above) has a background in user experience

  14. 3816040807_ff4a90b3b0_z
    by Angie Chang

    From Hackathon To Market: New App Teaches Chinese Calligraphy

    Watch the video for Chiu-Ki’s developer story of starting up Monkey Write at a hackathon.

    By Chiu-Ki Chan (Founder & Developer, Monkey Write)

    AT&T recently interviewed me on how I built Monkey Write from a hackathon prototype to a full business. This got me thinking about the wonderful adventure I’ve been having in the past few months.

    When I left Google to go to startups, I did so because I wanted to grow beyond coding, to get a holistic understanding of how products are built. Great products need more than just technology. What is the secret sauce? It took me a year and a half as a startup employee to realize the truth – there is no secret sauce.

    There are theories and conjectures, but the only way