Tag Archive: Mentorship

  1. heather-harde-2
    by Angie Chang

    Calling All Women 2.0 – We Need YOU To Be A Mentor

    “You should have had more women on that panel”

    By Heather Harde (Vice Chairman, sf.citi)

    “You didn’t have enough female-founder companies competing in the Startup Battlefield at Disrupt”… “You didn’t have enough women nominees for the Crunchies Awards”… “Your blog is not doing enough to advance women in technology”…

    These were all regular refrains I heard when I was the CEO of TechCrunch for five years.

  2. Rashmi Sinha
    by Angie Chang

    Rashmi Sinha, CEO And Co-Founder Of SlideShare (Acquired By LinkedIn) Speaking At Women 2.0 Conference February 14

    Entrepreneur and angel investor Rashmi Sinha of SlideShare fame coming to Women 2.0 Conference on February 14 – join us!

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Women 2.0 is excited to welcome entrepreneur Rashmi Sinha, CEO and co-founder of SlideShare, to 2013 Women 2.0 Conference on February 14. She will be speaking on a panel that includes founding members of Flipboard, LUMO BodyTech and Easilydo about “The Next Billion”, this year’s conference theme.

  3. i_heart_innovation_feb_14_2013_women2_conf
    by Angie Chang

    Investor, Be Mine

    On Valentine’s Day, entrepreneurs are encouraged to rub elbows with investors at the Women 2.0 Conference in San Francisco!

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    Mentorship is a popular topic of discussion, and more difficult to do. Instead of fretting about how to find the perfect mentor and establishing a lifetime bond to last through your career, you can do something now to improve your situation as an aspiring or current early-stage entrepreneur.

  4. 7150943393_2206b713f8_z
    by Angie Chang

    Investors Are The Nucleus Of Entrepreneurship – Meet Dozens Of Them At The Women 2.0 Conference

    Women 2.0 encourages me to build a healthy nucleus for a cell that aspires to thrive.

    By Katrina Salas-Padilla (Contributing Writer, Women 2.0)

    To a budding entrepreneur what could be sexier than intimate contact with the coveted almighty power of a willing investor? One might argue that a computer engineer and UX designer duo might give networking with an angel investor a run for its money on the ‘sexy’ meter.

    However, it would only be a matter of time

  5. by Angie Chang

    What Got You Here Won’t Get You There – A Mentor Will

    Sometimes asking for help is the most important thing a person can do in their career.

    By Wendy Lea (CEO, Get Satisfaction)

    You need to know that what got you here won’t get you there.

    At a certain point, you must recognize that you can’t go the entrepreneurial journey alone.

    Let’s talk about relationship building via technology.

  6. tc-logo_1000
    by Angie Chang

    (Video) 60 Seconds Of Inspiration In Technovation Challenge PSA

    We have teams of girls from Alaska to Yemen signing up to learn to code apps and launch companies – and they need mentors!

    By Dara Olmsted (Director of Development, Iridescent)

    Technovation Challenge, a 12-week program that teaches high school girls to create phone apps and start businesses, just released an inspiring, short public service announcement (PSA) about the program.

    In sixty seconds of video, we show what a life-changing program Technovation is. Our girls reach for the sky, solve tough

  7. women2.0_pitch
    by Angie Chang

    Get Mentored During Lunch At PITCH NYC Conference On November 14

    November 14′s PITCH Conference will hold mentoring over lunch.

    By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

    We have over two dozen mentors joining us on November 14 at PITCH NYC Conference – have face time with them over lunch!

    From investors to entrepreneurs, from product experts to marketing gurus, our mentors will cover topics from funding to growth, idea generation to lean startup practices, from product marketing to product design, these mentors will be coming

  8. 4329028140_3d8019b69b_z
    by Angie Chang

    Women In Tech Like Working For Other Women In Tech

    Research shows that women gravitate toward women-led companies.

    By Blake Landau (Founder, Artemis)

    Get Satisfaction Vice President of Marketing Azita Martin never realized she was the only woman in the room, until she wasn’t. “Now that I’m here at Get Satisfaction, I realize how refreshing it is. You don’t realize how weird being the only woman actually is until you go somewhere else where there is not only another woman, but a woman CEO,” she said.

  9. tc-logo_1000
    by Angie Chang

    Mentor A Teenage Girl At Technovation And Give Back!

    When you were a teenager, did you have a female mentor or role model who showed you that girls can grow up to be programmers, entrepreneurs, and leaders?

    By Dara Olmsted (Director of Development, Iridescent)

    Help the next generation of girls learn to code and start companies – sign up to be a Technovation Challenge mentor today. This year, Technovation is going global and we have hundreds of teams from around the world who need strong, female mentors like you to inspire and lead them. No experience necessary – we will train you.

  10. Woman-at-Lunch
    by Angie Chang

    Why It Pays To Mentor Women… Literally

    Mentoring and supporting more junior employees makes good sense for your own career.

    By Leah Eichler (Contributing Writer, Femme-O-Nomics)

    It’s time to stop the blame game. You know, the one where women quietly admit to each other that senior female executives play a role in the gender gap by not supporting more junior women or even thwarting their rise. It’s often referred to as the “queen bee” syndrome, meaning that there is only enough room for one of us at the top.

    I hear it all the time but each additional reference adds to my disappointment since the myth itself hinders the advancement of women. Firstly, it reinforces the belief that women should blame each other for their lack of professional growth. Secondly, it

  11. group_picture
    by Angie Chang

    High School Girls Learn To Code And Design Mobile Games

    Iridescent’s program gives high school girls the skills and confidence needed to succeed in computer science and entrepreneurship.

    By Karen Holst (Co-Founder, Pick-A-Prof & VP Institutional Development, MyEdu)

    While volunteering with Iridescent’s Technovation Challenge, I would often come home from mentoring the group of teenage girls with a smile on my face and a fist pump in the air. “Finally!”

    It seemed the only word that fit. Finally, a program for high school girls that exposes them to the startup world, teaches them what it takes to be a high-tech entrepreneur and gives them a glimmer of what they could grow up to become. It’s the “confidence-building-change-your-life” experience fitting for any girl out there. Don’t you wish they had this when you were in high school?

  12. 4664734666_c62da398c0_z
    by Angie Chang

    To Close the Gender Gap, Focus on Assignments

    Mentors and mentees should heed the sacrosanct 70-20-10 rule.

    By Herminia Ibarra (Contributor, Harvard Business Review)

    A new McKinsey study reports statistically what we already knew from personal experience: that mid-career and senior women tend to be found disproportionally in staff jobs, or “pink ghettos,” relative to men.

    The report tells us that 50% to 65% of women at the vice-president level and higher are in staff roles, compared with only 41% to 48% of men, who are more likely to be in the line jobs that lead to the top.

    This subtler gender gap — one that is difficult to detect

  13. 6862500226_587fc30fc8_z
    by Angie Chang

    Mentorship From Silicon Valley Techies Encourages High School Girls To Dream Bigger

    How mentoring a team of underserved high school girls affected a Silicon Valley techie.

    By Harini Sridharan (Senior Strategist, Rosetta)

    Let me start with a statistic that some of you might already know: While women make 47% of the U.S. workforce, only 5% of startups are owned by women. And here’s another: In 2010, only 2.4% of the U.S. Fortune 500 chief executives were female.

    I am a techie. We, in the field, love numbers. We ooh and aah at statistics. Our presentations are decorated with them.

    But there are stories and experiences behind these numbers that are the real deal. Numbers are just a way of summarizing these experiences to a 140-character paced audience.