Healthy Apps And Eating Tips For Thanksgiving

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Pittsburgh nursing professor Lora Burke discussed research findings that suggested individuals using a food tracking app with notifications or suggestions to eat healthier actually had an easier time doing so. By Amy Puliafito (Research & Marketing Manager, Rock Health)

Odds are you have a hefty meal in your future. Here are some tips and apps that might help offset the holiday 5!

Health Tip #1 - Eat early.

Data collected with Massive’s Health Eatery app suggest that eating earlier may help you make healthier eating choices.

In a recent interview with MIT’s Technology Review, Eatery founder Aza Raskin said, ”We found that for every hour of the day people eat worse,” he says. “That’s very actionable: if you decide between lunch at 12 or 2, at 2 you’ll eat 4% worse.”

Health Tip #2 - Track what you eat.

In the same interview, Pittsburgh nursing professor Lora Burke discussed research findings that suggested individuals using a food tracking app with notifications or suggestions to eat healthier actually had an easier time doing so.

Food tracking apps include the Eatery, Super Diet Genius, MyFitnessPal and Nutrition Menu.

Health Tip #3 - Plan on eating out? There’s a healthy app for that.

Having healthy options give you a better chance of skipping unhealthy eats.

Try GoodFoodNearYou to find healthy options in your area. Just make sure to call ahead to verify restaurants will be open on Thanksgiving!

Health Tip #4 - Go veg!

Vegetarian diets tend to be lower calorie, lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, and higher in fiber, potassium and vitamin C.

Vegetarians tend to weigh less than meat-eaters, and to have lower cancer rates (NIH News). Try the VegOut app to find veggie options in your area, or Locavore to find what delicious produce is in season for your Thanksgiving fixings.

Health Tip #5 - Plan your healthy meal in advance.

Plan out your meal with healthier options using an app for your grocery list, like Grocery Gadgets.

This post was originally posted at Rock Health's blog. About the guest blogger: Amy Puliafito is the Research and Marketing Manager at Rock Health, contributeing to research, social media, and marketing at Rock Health. Previously, she worked for the Keck School of Medicine of USC and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School for Public Health, and was in charge of fundraising at a non-profit that led international training trips for physicians in Mongolia and China. She holds a BA in sociology from Northwestern. Follow her on Twitter at @amypuliafito.