Four Ways Women Stunt Their Careers Unintentionally (HBR)

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By Jill Flynn, Kathryn Heath, & Mary Davis Holt (Principals, Flynn Heath Holt Leadership)

Having combed through more than a thousand 360-degree performance assessments conducted in recent years, we’ve found, by a wide margin, that the primary criticism men have about their female colleagues is that the women they work with seem to exhibit low self-confidence.

Our gut says that this may partly be a perception issue — we’ve observed that men sometimes interpret (or misinterpret) an inclination in women to share credit or defer judgment as a lack of confidence. Still, perception or not, there is some research to suggest that women themselves feel less self-assured at work than men.

A study released in 2011 by Europe’s Institute of Leadership and Management revealed that women report having lower confidence in regard to their careers.

» Read the full article at the The Harvard Review.