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This Is What An Angel Investor Looks Like – Jessica Roazzi Magoch

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Women 2.0 profiles women angel investors in our weekly “This Is What An Angel Investor Looks Like” series.

By Angie Chang (Co-Founder & Editor-in-Chief, Women 2.0)

A former VP at Atlantis Health Plan, Jessica Roazzi Magoch was interested in social entrepreneurship: “When I first heard of social entrepreneurship, I thought it had something to do with Facebook or social media. Then I realized it’s just companies doing what they’re supposed to do: good.”

She believes that successful companies should seek a public and social dividend rather than profit, because just giving away a percentage of profits as an after-thought is not enough.

 

Meet Angel Investor Jessica Roazzi Magoch

How and why did you decide to become an angel investor?
“When I realized I could have more growth and make more of an impact by investing in private companies rather than large publicly traded ones.”

What investments have you made?

Company: PhilanTech
Founder(s): Dahna Goldstein*

*Woman founder!

What types of companies do you look to invest in?
“Healthcare and software.”

What are some investment dealbreakers?
“The founder must have a strong advisory board and be willing to step down from her position when she realizes she’s outgrown her expertise.”

How has your background played a role in angel investing?
“My expertise is in sales and that is usually one of the main areas lacking in a startup; if I feel I can help I will likely invest.”

One piece of advice to an angel-in-training?
“Jump in headfirst and don’t be intimidated by all the new information. Lean on your fellow angels for help.”

One piece of advice to an entrepreneur looking for capital?
“Don’t look at investors as a necessary evil — consider them valuable advisors and cheerleaders.”

What does impact investing mean to you?
“If you believe your money is energy and that which you direct your energy toward will expand, it makes sense to put your money towards positive social impact.”

How would you define a for-profit social venture?
“A company whose primary mission is to have positive social impact and secondarily supports that in a for-profit structure”

Favorite quote?
“How you treat yourself is how you treat God because you are the representation of God on this earth.” — Iyanla Vanzant

Random fact?
“I make a mean tomato sauce!”

Apply to the Pipeline Fellowship and help change the face of angel investing!

This interview was originally posted at Pipeline Fellowship’s blog.

Angie Chang is Editor-in-Chief and Co-Founder of Women 2.0, a media company offering content, community and conferences for aspiring and current women innovators in technology. Our mission is to increase the number of female founders of technology startups with inspiration, information and education through our platform. Previously, Angie held roles in product management and web UI design. Angie holds a B.A. in English and Social Welfare from UC Berkeley. Follow her on Twitter at @thisgirlangie.